NICD Welcomes Registered Dental Hygienist Lisa Dennis

Lisa Dennis

We are proud to announce the addition of Lisa Dennis, RDH, to our team at Nebraska Institute of Comprehensive Dentistry (NICD). 

“Lisa Dennis has worked in some of the best dental offices in the country, from Florida to California, gaining expertise through a relentless pursuit of continuing education. Her passion for her profession allows her patients to achieve excellent, life-enhancing oral health,” said Michael Sesemann, DDS, operating owner of NICD. 

Lisa’s continuing education endeavors include taking courses from some of the profession’s top educators and training at leading dental institutes. In addition to being an accomplished dental hygienist, she is skilled in the use of digital X-rays, intraoral photography, local anesthesia, implant maintenance, Invisalign, laser therapy and Botox and other therapeutic and cosmetic injectables.

“I knew at a young age my calling was to be in this profession. Not only is it an honor to be able to provide a valuable service but also to create long-term relationships that allow me to motivate, encourage and educate patients about excellence in dentistry. There is nothing more rewarding than being part of creating a healthy, beautiful smile that a patient can be proud of and that lasts a lifetime,” Lisa said. “I am excited about this next chapter of my career at NICD.” 

“When a business can add a person of Lisa’s character, energy and expertise, it helps elevate the entire team and contributes to our ability to provide world-class dental care for our patients. We are all very excited to work with Lisa in the coming years,” added Dr. Sesemann.

NICD Team Receives COVID-19 Vaccines

We are pleased to announce that your dental team at NICD received the first round of Moderna COVID-19 vaccine during the week of January 10, with the second inoculation planned within 21 days.

This adds an extra layer of safety to the measures that already have been implemented at the office, which include:

• Air purifiers with HEPA 13 filters and ionizing mechanisms

• Fogging of the office in between patients and at night with hypochlorous (200 PPM) mist, an environmentally and physiologically safe method of sanitization

• Pre-appointment rinsing with molecular iodine, established as the top anti-coronavirus oral rinse

• Increased personal protective equipment (PPE) with upgraded masks featuring N-95 and KN-95 protection

• High-volume evacuation utilized in any aerosol-producing procedure

• Social distancing in a low-traffic environment, where patients can easily be isolated from each other

• Temperatures and virus questionnaire administered before admittance

• Standard dental sterilization and sanitization procedures

“Dentistry has historically been at the forefront of disinfection and sterilization procedures and now, during the coronavirus outbreak, we’ve taken that to a new level,” said Dr. Sesemann. “I am very proud of my staff for embracing these challenges and implementing these new techniques for the safety of all of our patients and their families. We also are very thankful that our patients have been so conscientious about reporting any potential COVID-19 contacts, and not taking any chances by coming into the office if they have the slightest health concerns.”

NICD Office Update on COVID-19

Dear friends, patients and colleagues:

I hope this message finds you well and safe. I am writing to inform you of how NICD will be conducting business in April and May.

The most recent modeling projects that our Nebraska communities will reach peak viral experience in late April and early May. Consistent with the best practices advised by the American Dental Association, the Nebraska Dental Board and our community leaders, NICD will be closed during the months of April and May. This action will help to diminish the community spread of COVID-19 and to “flatten the curve,” which will reduce the number of illnesses and deaths among our fellow citizens.

Our dental team will be available for emergency needs and essential services, either by phone or in person by appointment. My cell phone number is (402) 960-4380. Feel free to contact either of us with any questions, comments or needs you may have during the coming months.

On a personal note, I would like to urge each and every one of you to practice all of the recommendations the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have put forth. We have the benefit of living in a sparsely populated state, but in no way should we assume that what is happening in more densely populated areas could not happen here as well. Being a proud Nebraskan, I would like to think that we have the grit to persevere through anything. With that, I wish you and your families the best during these unprecedented, challenging times.

Warmest regards,

Michael Sesemann and Staff

Study Shows Water Fluoridation Helps Adults

It has been known for decades that water fluoridation prevents tooth decay in children. Now there’s research showing that it does the same for adults.

The evidence comes from a study conducted by the Australian National Survey of Adult Oral Health that recently was published in the Journal of Dental Research.

Most surprising was the discovery that adults who had not had fluoride as children still received decay-fighting benefits from water fluoridation as adults. This reinforces the theory that water fluoridation has a topical effect in preventing dental decay.

Research has long shown that when people are exposed to that during their formative years, their dentitions are more strongly crystallized and gain increased resistance to decay. 

The Nebraska Institute of Comprehensive Dentistry is a dental office in Omaha, Neb., that specializes in comprehensive and cosmetic dentistry. To make an appointment for a dental checkup, call 402-392-2880.

the evidence comes from a study conducted by the Australian National Survey of Adult Oral Health that recently was published in the Journal of Dental Research. Most surprising was the discovery that adults who had not had fluoride as children still received decay-fighting benefits from water fluoridation as adults. This reinforces the theory that has a topical effect in preventing dental decay. Research has long shown that when people are exposed to water fluoridation during their formative years, their dentitions are more strongly crystallized and gain an increased resistance to decay.
 

NICD Celebrates Another 25th Anniversary

Don’t let her youthful demeanor fool you. Christy VanRyckeghem, CDA, has been on staff with Dr. Michael Sesemann for 25 years, acting as Comprehensive Case Coordinator for much of that time.
 
Christy is the fourth staff member to have devoted 25 years to NICD, and she claims the time has flown by. “Our practice has evolved so much and the type of dentistry we do is so interesting. Every day is different. We could be restoring a smile, placing an implant, doing a gum graft or even lip augmentation.
 
“I’m really proud to be a part of a practice where what we do is such a team effort – patients recognize it and tell people about us. That makes it all worthwhile.”

According to Dr. Sesemann, patients also recognize Christy for her compassion. “One of Christy’s most important contributions to our team is her support of patients. They often comment on how sincerely caring she is.”

Please join Dr. Sesemann and NICD in congratulating Christy on 25 years of devotion to dental excellence.

he evidence comes from a study conducted by the Australian National Survey of Adult Oral Health that recently was published in the Journal of Dental Research. Most surprising was the discovery that adults who had not had fluoride as children still received decay-fighting benefits from water fluoridation as adults. This reinforces the theory that water fluoridation has a topical effect in preventing dental decay. Research has long shown that when people are exposed to water fluoridation during their formative years, their dentitions are more strongly crystallized and gain an increased resistance to decay.
 

Cheese may protect teeth from cavities

Here’s one more reason to keep cheese lovers happy: Cheese may help keep a smile healthy.

Eating cheese was shown in a new study to increase dental plaque pH, which in turn decreased the odds of developing cavities in patients. The study was published in the May/June 2013 issue General Dentistry.

“What I think is exciting about this is it shows that cheese -particularly as a snack- can reduce the acids that will cause cavities and gum disease,” Dr. Jeffrey M. Cole, president of the Academy of General Dentistry, said to CBSNews.com.

Sixty-eight adolescent subjects between the ages of 12 and 15 were enrolled in the study. Dentists measured their dental plaque pH before they ate dairy and after.

A baseline pH of 7 means the environment is neutral. Anything above or below 7 is considered basic or acidic, respectively. A pH level lower than 5.5 puts a person at risk for tooth erosion, which is when the protective enamel layer on the teeth is worn away. This leaves the tooth vulnerable to cavities, also known as dental caries, and other problems.

After the initial dental plaque pH levels were taken, the subjects were told to eat cheddar cheese, drink milk or eat sugar-free yogurt for three minutes and then rinse their mouths with water. The researchers then measured pH levels 10, 20 and 30 minutes after the subjects stopped eating.

The subjects who ate the milk and sugar-free yogurt had no pH changes. However, those who ate cheese had a quick, steady increase of pH as time progressed.

Researchers believe that eating cheese stimulates saliva production, which is the body’s way of keeping the mouth at a normal acidity level. The saliva acts as a flush to remove any residue in your mouth, and also provides a buffer against high levels of acidity.

Cole points out that cheese contains pyrophosphates, which is a salt or ester that is commonly found in fluorides and toothpaste. They can work to re-mineralize a tooth that has been surrounded by acid.

Even better news is that no fat, low fat and regular cheese have the same properties, so people can snack on a healthier option while still getting the same benefits. Some cheeses can be packed with saturated fats and sodium.

Before cheese was considered a good snack because it wasn’t a bad food item when it came to teeth, Cole explained. Now, this study shows that dentists can rest assured that cheese can actually keep a person grinning.

“In a lot of low-carb diets, string cheese is the go-to snack,” Cole commented. “(Cheese) not only it fits one of those diets, it’s actually good for your teeth! It makes it all the much better.”

Omaha dentist among featured speakers at international dental summit

Michael R. Sesemann, DDS, was among several international lecturers invited to address the Future of Restorative Dentistry Leadership Summit, held recently in Orlando by Ivoclar Vivadent, a global dental product innovator.

Dr. Sesemann addressed an audience of 30 leading dentists from North America and Europe on the topic, Bulk Fill Works in Practice: Balancing Efficiency and Long-Term Performance with Direct Posterior Composites. Special emphasis was placed on evidence-based case studies from his dental practice at the Nebraska Institute of Comprehensive Dentistry (NICD) in Omaha.

Bulk Fill is a new composite restorative material created to maintain a high degree of esthetic and functional integrity while improving production time and reducing procedural stresses on the treated teeth. In 2010, Dr. Sesemann was one of the first North American dentists to be selected to research the product.

“This summit brought together an esteemed collection of presenters and a great group of professionals,” said Dr. George Tysowsky, Vice President of Research and Development for Ivoclar Vivadent. “We discussed very important trends that are currently impacting dentistry, including Bulk Fill restorative materials, new technologies, and new cementation protocols.”

PHOTO:  Event attendees

Michael R. Sesemann, DDS, was among several international lecturers invited to address the Future of Restorative Dentistry Leadership Summit, held recently in Orlando by Ivoclar Vivadent, a global dental product innovator. Dr. Sesemann addressed an audience of 30 leading dentists from North America and Europe on the topic, Bulk Fill Works in Practice: Balancing Efficiency and Long-Term Performance with Direct Posterior Composites. Special emphasis was placed on evidence-based case studies from his dental practice at Nebraska Institute of Comprehensive Dentistry (NICD) in Omaha. Bulk Fill is a new composite restorative material created to maintain a high degree of esthetic and functional integrity while improving production time and reducing procedural stresses on the treated teeth. In 2010, Dr. Sesemann was one of the first North American dentists to be selected to research the product. “This summit brought together an esteemed collection of presenters and a great group of professionals,” said Dr. George Tysowsky, Vice President of Research and Development for Ivoclar Vivadent. “We discussed very important trends that are currently impacting dentistry, including Bulk Fill restorative materials, new technologies, and new cementation protocols.” PHOTO: Event attendees
 

What’s the best physical asset as we age?

Survey says: the smile. That’s according to 1,018 Americans, age 18 and older, who responded to a study regarding perceptions of aging and beauty.

Conducted by Kelton-Global Marketing Research Company, the survey showed that 45 percent of respondents believe a person’s smile can most easily defy the effects of aging. The eyes came in second at 34 percent.

Here are some other noteworthy statistics from the study:

• 54 percent of the population over age 50 believe the smile to be the feature that can best overcome the appearance of aging. Only 39 percent of their younger counterparts felt the same.

• 80 percent of adults admit they would spend money to hide or correct aging flaws.

• Women are more likely than men (84 percent vs. 75 percent) to invest in improvements.

• Of the women surveyed, 63 percent said they would fix their teeth before they would pay for a weight loss plan.

• Among respondents willing to invest in cosmetic treatments, 62 percent would spend on preserving their smile; 48 percent would pay for weight loss; 33 percent would treat thinning hair; 33 percent would reduce dark under-eye circles; 31 percent would eliminate wrinkles; and 28 percent would repair spider veins in their legs.

Dr. Michael Sesemann joins Kois Center Advisory Board

Omaha dentist Michael R. Sesemann, DDS, has been selected to sit on the advisory board for the prestigious Kois Center for Advancing Dentistry Through Science in Seattle, WA. Founded and directed by John C. Kois, DMD, MSD, the center offers clinical and didactic courses on esthetics, implants, occlusion and restorative dentistry.

As part of the advisory board, Dr. Sesemann’s role is to provide direction for the center and to act as a liaison between the organization, its members and the dental community.  

“I am proud to have been chosen to represent the Kois Center in its mission to assist members in gaining the knowledge and skills to help them advance to extraordinary levels in providing dentistry in their communities. Certainly my experiences at the center have been of benefit to my patients and my practice,” said Dr. Sesemann.

To learn more about the Seattle-based Kois Center, visit www.koiscenter.com.

Michael R. Sesemann, DDS, was among several international lecturers invited to address the Future of Restorative Dentistry Leadership Summit, held recently in Orlando by Ivoclar Vivadent, a global dental product innovator. Dr. Sesemann addressed an audience of 30 leading dentists from North America and Europe on the topic, Bulk Fill Works in Practice: Balancing Efficiency and Long-Term Performance with Direct Posterior Composites. Special emphasis was placed on evidence-based case studies from his dental practice at Nebraska Institute of Comprehensive Dentistry (NICD) in Omaha. Bulk Fill is a new composite restorative material created to maintain a high degree of esthetic and functional integrity while improving production time and reducing procedural stresses on the treated teeth. In 2010, Dr. Sesemann was one of the first North American dentists to be selected to research the product. “This summit brought together an esteemed collection of presenters and a great group of professionals,” said Dr. George Tysowsky, Vice President of Research and Development for Ivoclar Vivadent. “We discussed very important trends that are currently impacting dentistry, including Bulk Fill restorative materials, new technologies, and new cementation protocols.” PHOTO: Event attendees
 

Dental X-rays and brain cancer: “News” isn’t always worthy

FACT:   Today’s dental radiation levels have been found to be comparable to those we absorb during a two-hour plane ride or while working in the back yard for a few hours. 

Part of our responsibility at NICD is to review and vet the scientific content of news pertaining to our profession. That said, a recent story in the American Cancer Society’s journal, Cancer, caught the attention of many. Entitled “Dental X-Rays and Risk of Meningioma,” the article summarized a study that sought to develop a correlation between dental X-rays and brain cancer. The story was picked up by several networks and broadcasted widely.*

After assessing the study upon which the article was based, the American Dental Association (ADA) and the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) have found it to be flawed. Of primary concern is that conclusions were drawn using a “population-based-control study.” This means data was collected by means of recall and self-reporting on the part of the study group, often decades after the X-ray occurrences.

Failure to account for significant advancements in dental radiography is another of the study’s major errors.  Conclusions were drawn from antiquated machines of yesteryear to formulate conclusions for current day. There was no calibration for the sensitive technology now utilized.

“It is regrettable to think that an article based on outdated technology could scare the public and cause them to avoid needed treatment,” said AGD president Dr. Howard Gamble. 

At NICD, we also must side with the ADA and AGD in expressing that the report was seriously flawed and detrimental to the public we serve. Please know that we encourage you to ask any questions you may have — we’re here to help guide you toward the healthiest solutions for you.

NOTE: As a Section Editor of Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry, and a member of other dental publication editorial boards, Dr. Sesemann stays current on scientific dental literature. He is pleased to share information that impacts your health, orally and in general. We pledge that we will always make decisions concerning radiographic type and frequency based the needs of each individual, and after a careful and thorough assessment of their personal conditions and the current science involved in any treatment. It is a commitment we take very seriously.

* The article originally appeared on April 10, 2012.